Midnight Shark Biofluorescence Research!
Dr. David Gruber of Luminescent Labs in the Bahamas searching for biological fluorescence in sharks. Recently, the LL Team has published the neon fluorescent phenomena to be present in two gorgeous shark species: Cephaloscyllium ventriosum and Scyliorhinus retifer.

Midnight Shark Biofluorescence Research!

Dr. David Gruber of Luminescent Labs in the Bahamas searching for biological fluorescence in sharks. Recently, the LL Team has published the neon fluorescent phenomena to be present in two gorgeous shark species: Cephaloscyllium ventriosum and Scyliorhinus retifer.

July 20, 2014 | 32 notes
Emerging Explorers Program -- National Geographic

Luminescent Labs member David Gruber enlisted as National Geographic Emerging Explorer. More subsea glowing discoveries to come…

May 17, 2014 | 7 notes
Neon Sharks Caught on Camera

April 13, 2014 | 59 notes
In Search of Biofluorescence…
Dr. David Gruber and the team from Luminescent Labs conducting midnight reef research off Mborokua Island, Solomon Islands.
Photo: Wade Fairley

In Search of Biofluorescence…

Dr. David Gruber and the team from Luminescent Labs conducting midnight reef research off Mborokua Island, Solomon Islands.

Photo: Wade Fairley

April 6, 2014 | 25 notes
Biofluorescent Synodontidae (Au naturel)
Some fish need genetic implantation to give off a light show of this caliber. But, this lizardfish shines naturally!  Here is Synodus saurus exhibiting her inherent green biofluorescent properties. 
Lizardfish heads resemble those of lizards and they have slender, cylindrical bodies. Some lizardfish can grow to almost two feet long. They can be found in tropical and subtropical marine waters and much prefer sandy environments.
For more information on their secret light show, see: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0083259
Photo: Drs. David Gruber/John Sparks 

Biofluorescent Synodontidae (Au naturel)

Some fish need genetic implantation to give off a light show of this caliber. But, this lizardfish shines naturally!  Here is Synodus saurus exhibiting her inherent green biofluorescent properties. 

Lizardfish heads resemble those of lizards and they have slender, cylindrical bodies. Some lizardfish can grow to almost two feet long. They can be found in tropical and subtropical marine waters and much prefer sandy environments.

For more information on their secret light show, see: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0083259

Photo: Drs. David Gruber/John Sparks 

March 27, 2014 | 37 notes
amnhnyc:

Scientists have identified more than 180 species of fishes that glow in a wide range of colors and patterns. The research shows that biofluorescence—a phenomenon by which organisms absorb light, transform it, and eject it as a different color—is common and variable among marine fish species, indicating its potential use in communication and mating. The report opens the door for the discovery of new fluorescent proteins that could be used in biomedical research.
Learn more.

amnhnyc:

Scientists have identified more than 180 species of fishes that glow in a wide range of colors and patterns. The research shows that biofluorescence—a phenomenon by which organisms absorb light, transform it, and eject it as a different color—is common and variable among marine fish species, indicating its potential use in communication and mating. The report opens the door for the discovery of new fluorescent proteins that could be used in biomedical research.

Learn more.

(via npr)

March 19, 2014 | 1257 notes
❝ Anything found to be true for E. coli [bacteria] must also be true of elephants ❞

— Jacques Monod - 1954

March 18, 2014 | 14 notes
Fluorescent seahorse.
Biofluorescence of the seahorse, Hippocampus erectus. 
Photo: Drs. David Gruber, Vincent Pieribone, John Sparks.  Animation: Emma Welles.

Fluorescent seahorse.

Biofluorescence of the seahorse, Hippocampus erectus. 

Photo: Drs. David Gruber, Vincent Pieribone, John Sparks.  Animation: Emma Welles.

(Source: luminescentlabs)

March 16, 2014 | 192 notes
South Pacific Submarine Descent
Luminescent Lab’s Drs. David Gruber and John Sparks getting ready to submerge 1000 meters on this Solomon Island coral reef  —in search of luminescent and fluorescent creatures. Dave McAloney does a final system of the Triton 3300/3 before dropping down… 
Photo: Ken Corben

South Pacific Submarine Descent

Luminescent Lab’s Drs. David Gruber and John Sparks getting ready to submerge 1000 meters on this Solomon Island coral reef  —in search of luminescent and fluorescent creatures. Dave McAloney does a final system of the Triton 3300/3 before dropping down… 

Photo: Ken Corben

March 12, 2014 | 6 notes
The Retro Submarine Suit 
This 1715 design by Englishman John Lethbridge is perhaps the earliest known model of an atmospheric diving suit. Donning his “diving engine”, Lethbridge made several 20-minute dives to 20 meters; including one to salvage sunken silver treasure chests from the English Indiaman Vansittart in Cape Verdes.
Check out Luminescent Labs summer plans to use the latest atmospheric diving suit to search for submerged treasures in the ocean darkness: bioluminescent animals!

The Retro Submarine Suit 

This 1715 design by Englishman John Lethbridge is perhaps the earliest known model of an atmospheric diving suit. Donning his “diving engine”, Lethbridge made several 20-minute dives to 20 meters; including one to salvage sunken silver treasure chests from the English Indiaman Vansittart in Cape Verdes.

Check out Luminescent Labs summer plans to use the latest atmospheric diving suit to search for submerged treasures in the ocean darkness: bioluminescent animals!

March 10, 2014 | 32 notes